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Reviewed 7 July 2014

Not sure this is the correct name for this establishment. There was no sign in the front, and no calling cards at the front desk. In fact, the front desk was never manned the entire time that we were there. We think this is the Government Hostel mentioned in the Lonely Planet guild to Tibet. The rooms are cold and dank (no heat, but lots of blankets) and there were no ensuite bathrooms. The only bathrooms that we were aware of were the common-use pit toilets on the first floor. The toilets were across the corridor from the combination dining/sitting room, and this was by far the best feature of the hotel. The sitting room is kept very warm by a large coal burning stove in the middle of the room. And tea is served as soon as you sit down. They managed to serve our group of 25 a very good buffet dinner with lots of green vegetables. I think it helps to order ahead, and they were obviously prepared for us. The sitting room opens out into a terrace that is perfect for viewing the mountains. So taking into consideration that we're about 5 hours over bone-breaking roads from the the closest pave road, this is really not a bad place to stay. At the time we were there (June 2014) the only other option were that tents at the tent city up the road a bit. So, 1 or 2 stars, if this hotel was anywhere else, but I'll give it 3 stars taking into account the remote location.

Room Tip: You don't have a lot of options at Everest Base Camp, so just be grateful there's any place at all to stay.
  • Stayed: June 2014, travelled with friends
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Thank Roger F
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 20 April 2014

It's location is really it's only redeeming feature. It is just awful - but I say this as a fact and not a criticism. It has to be seen in relation to where it is - just miles away from anywhere at the end of a poor road where there is no running water and comparatively few visitors - and who runs it - a bunch of Tibetan youths who have never experienced Western culture/facilities first hand, and are isolated from mainstream society in an unforgiving surroundings and climate. Its to be understood that you can't expect much more than a roof over your head and some basic food.
The hotel on first sight looks OK; and even the cavernous foyer is OK and an effort has been made to make it attractive.
On the second floor is the restaurant/lounge area. It is large with plenty of low cushioned seating (a bit grubby) and tables, and the most GLORIOUS view of Everest from the large windows. There is a yak-dung stove in the centre which is kept burning all the time for warmth (read .. lots of acrid smoke in the room) and the staff are available there to serve tea, drinks and food (basic but acceptable). They all smoke all the time (read .. lots more acrid smoke in the room). Don't try and open the window for fresh air .... you are reprimanded in no uncertain terms to keep them closed so the room stays warm! There are also fantastic views from the balcony outside and the roof if you are too ill to take the +- 2hr trip to base camp itself.
Across the passage is a toilet. It is a largish room with a huge drum of water and a scoop, and alongside are two cubicles (M & F) but no doors. Squat, grubby and smelly (but by no means the worst in Tibet!). Do your thing and use the scoop. But take your own torch, paper and make sure your camera or bag/jacket can sling around your body: nowhere to hang or put anything and the floor is awash with water (I hope!).
No lift, so you will need to trudge with your luggage upstairs to your rooms. At well over 5 000m, this is a real effort. The rooms themselves are basic and OK: beds with plenty of bedding, a dressing table, waste basket and a cupboard. I rather suspect that none of the bedding had been washed recently (no surprise there) so take your own sleeping sheet/pillowcase if you are squeemish! The waste bin is significant: if you are nauseous from altitude sickness and need to throw up in a hurry in the night, it is the only thing to use!
There was not a working toilet on each floor when we were there (we were on 4th floor and the nearest was on 3rd floor). It is a real trial to use the loo in the night! Get up in the dark (no electrics after 10pm) and sub-zero temperatures, put on all your clothes and hiking boots (more on that later!), grab your torch and paper and stumble down the long corridor to the stairs at the end, down the stairs and find the loo entrance, Again, big room, two cubicles, foul and doorless. No trough. Just slits in the concrete, open to the outside air! Utterly disgusting is an understatement. Here is what Michael Palin says about the toilets at EBC in his book "Himalaya": The latrine is almost sub-human. It is hard enough to aim through a hole reduced to a slit by the calcified accretions of many previous visitors, without at the same time having to flash a torch to warn other guests and extract thin sheets of travel tissue in a freezing force 8 gale." Other things you need to do: hold your nose, flap your hand to keep the flies off you, keep your trouser bottoms up enough not to drag in the putrid filth on the floor, and ensure your aim is straight. Boots ensure at least that your feet stay sanitary. All this with a pounding head, nausea and exhaustion. Not fun.
But all this aside, I think this is preferable to the yak tents (which we went to see). The fires do not burn all night (no one to tend them), you sleep communally on matrasses on the floor and the toilets are just as bad if not worse, but you actually have to go some distance outside to reach them! So if its raining or snowing ...?
All of this sordidness is made up for by what you have come to see: the sublime face of Goddess Mother of the Earth/Qomolangma/Everest. I wouldn't have missed this for the world. And all the sordid details of the hotel make for fabulous travelers tales when you come home!

Room Tip: Get a room as low down as possible, and as close to the loo as possible!
  • Stayed: May 2013, travelled with friends
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1  Thank angtravel18
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 7 November 2011

Like most hotels in Tingri province this is not a place to stay inside your room as long it is not absolutely necessary.

In October, when the temperatures drop well below freezing, the room temperature is dropping down rapidly too - my water bottle was frozen next morning and I guess it was about 5°C below zero in the room - so wear everything you carry or bring a good sleeping bag. Heating is not the only one problem in spring and fall, there's no water at all (expect for the kitchen), most people have to use nature for doing there businesses and brushing their teeth...

The kitchen and the common room were warm (even in the early morning) and hot tea was offered all the time, meals were the best above 5000 meters I ever had.

The terrace offers a splendid view of Everst's north flank and the Rongbuk monastery, and that's the reason to get there!

Room Tip: The rooms are definitely not worth to stay in, the terrace is the place to be (or do a hike in the great scenery)!
  • Stayed: October 2011, travelled with friends
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5  Thank MGerth
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 7 August 2011

More commonly known as Rongbuk Hotel, but also as the Rongbo Hotel or even Sightseeing Platform Hotel. This is the hotel opposite the Rongbuk monastery. It was supposed to have been renovated last and earlier this year but it is difficult to see what has been done, if anything. The outside looks okay considering where it is (close to the northern Everest Base Camp) and the entrance foyer looks reasonable, even the rooms are liveable but certainly not spotless or tidy. Again one has to understand facilities up here are somewhat Spartan. Our travel company ensured us there were air conditioners and ensuites to all our hotels. Unfortunately there were certainly no ensuites (or A/C - who'd want one 5 kms up?), in fact, there were no washrooms on the floor and the communial toilet for the floor was at the end of the corridor (male and female separated, after passing through a common doorway) with no lights See photo below. Take your own toilet paper and/or water, torch and hand wipes. Most toilets are like this in Tingri province. There was a WC opposite the restaurant which had been tiled but were cracked and dirty. The alternative choices for accommodation are the Monastery Guesthouse or the nomad tents (which are very warm and cosy and would you would need your sleeping bags but the toilet is outside, a walk in the dark and the one we saw was overflowing). We didn't really properly sample the food, (noodle soup), at the Rongbuk Hotel as my wife suffered altitude sickness and we left before we could spend the night there. If you walk to the EBC look out for deer and the Himalayan marmot or "chubee".

  • Stayed: June 2011, travelled as a couple
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5  Thank Andihce
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 19 November 2014
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  • Stayed: November 2014, travelled with friends
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This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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