We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The Tripadvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.
Save
Review Highlights
Consistently interesting and beautiful views

A doable walk for anyone - my wife can be challenged by slopes but handled it well and the distance... read more

Reviewed 1 week ago
markgM7625IR
,
Melbourne, Australia
via mobile
All in one place

Canyon walk, Howitt park, Bright Splash park, Centenary Park - all of these are at the same place... read more

Reviewed 1 week ago
ashfaqf2016
,
Melbourne, Australia
via mobile
Read all 388 reviews
  
Reviews (388)
Filter reviews
388 results
Traveller rating
240
145
3
0
0
Traveller type
Time of year
LanguageAll languages
More languages
Traveller rating
240
145
3
0
0
Show reviews that mention
All reviews ovens river suspension bridge both sides gold mining beautiful scenery information boards bird life gold rush north side historical markers nice stroll alongside the river all ages bright township centre of town rail trail track
Selected filters
Filter
Updating list...
6 - 11 of 388 reviews
Reviewed 22 February 2021

Bright Canyon walk with return via the 2nd suspension bridge is great. Good exercise and scenery including old gold diggings and races for water. The river is also good for a swim - safer at the town park.

Date of experience: February 2021
Thank rayharding
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 9 February 2021

Interesting walk beside the Ovens River from the centre of town. Option of a shorter or longer walk each with a suspension bridge over the river and return walk on the other side. We took the longer walk and really enjoyed the exercise and scenery.

Date of experience: February 2021
Thank Ginty012
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 20 January 2021 via mobile

Excellent walk in the centre of town takes approx 1 hour without being to strenuous.Great for all ages, stop and have a dip in the river if you need to cool down.

Date of experience: January 2021
1  Thank ShanoP
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 19 January 2021

Review covers the Canyon Walk, Ovens River, Bright, Victoria

Start with the Ovens River – this thing about exploration, heritage communities, settlements and potable water. The river rises in the Victorian Alps, flows westwards and draws water from 18 tributaries over >200 km before reaching the King River at Wangaratta. It falls 400 m. The valley and land thereabouts were once the home of the Ya-itma-thang tribal people who called the river the ‘Burwang’. European pioneers first arrived hereabouts in the early 19th century and, from mid-century on, gold mining and settlement followed. On the Canyon Walk you’re exploring just 4-5 km of the river in a couple of hours.
The Canyon Walk takes you downstream either side of the Ovens River from Bright to the rail trail bridge and return to the township – for those with the time available – or there’s the shorter option of crossing the river by one of the two wire suspension bridges that are about halfway between the rail trail bridge and the township. The depth of the river and/or the rate of flow prevents you from fording the river (unless you’re really prepared to strip-off and swim across – making sure that your shoes/clothes remain dry/secure). Depth was 1.5 m in the canyon according to the gauge during our walk during early November.
The walk is one of the easy-to-do activities in Bright – easy, informative, free; what’s more to ask when you’re in the beauty of this reconstructed/revegetated river valley that belies the environmental disaster that once was ‘gold mining’ >100 years ago. The various information boards alongside the river in Bright, describe with old photos and new words the state of the valley following both the casual alluvial mining of the many hundreds of early miners and, subsequently, the industrial mining that resulted with the use of floating dredges.
You can catch a glimpse of the destructive nature of industrial mining just east of Bright when following the Cherry Walk upstream along the Ovens River valley. Dredges worked the valley for more than 50 years from the turn of the 20th century – with selected focus upon the 50 km stretch from Harrietville to Eurobin. Within 10 years of starting the 36 dredges at work in the valley at that time were estimated to be destroying 250 ha of fertile flatlands each year. This met with fierce resistance by landowners in some communities. More than 100 years later, much of the wastelands created remain.
You don’t actually see this kind of over-view during a pleasant couple of hours on the Canyon Walk unless, of course, you’re searching for it – and then there are the message boards with photos that help place what you’re seeing in context. Times, and the socio-economic values that change with them, focus upon the robust environmental messages that continue to impact industrial exploitation of this kind into the modern era.
What you see when following the Canyon Walk – as the name suggest - are sheer rock faces on either side of the river up to 15 m high, piles of fragmented rocks alongside and in the water, turbulent flow (challenging those with the skills to navigate a small boat downstream) and, importantly, the natural beauty of this deep sunken valley now that the miners have long gone.
Although small-scale mining has a different perspective as ‘historical’ during our walk we came across a couple of men chancing their luck with a pan when exploiting the nooks and crannies where the water met the land beneath the cliffs. You needed the tenacity of a mountain goat to scramble down and back. The weather was great – warm, sunny, comfortable; the place was sparkling with clear water, moist air, bird life and vegetation.
And then there was this flashback of part-time mining. Sure, the impact on the environment is negligible. There was a Disneyesque image about it … as if you expected to see historical activities of this kind. Except there was a very up-to-date reason for the one miner to whom we spoke – calling down the slope from the path above – greetings and curiosity. He’d lost a service job to Covid-19 and felt better panning than watching television and/or gardening at home - and expected to find a trace or two of gold.
What you do find along the trails are the remnants of the 19th century sluicing that featured small-scale mining - groups of men shovelling gold-bearing earth and gravel into a tail race containing a sluicing box that separated out and captured the heavier gold. The remains of the races/channels cut into the sides of the canyon bear testimony to the numbers in the team who shared the work and the rewards. The rock/earthworks remain permanent reminders of those who have gone before. Information boards describe how the system worked.
The trail is easy, comfortable and interesting. On the Bright Township side of the river there’s hard smooth paving to the first of the suspension bridges – easy wheeling country; elsewhere the path is packed gravel, rocks and/or bare/grassed soil, but still easy walking – for those who are mobile. Be aware of the steep slopes down to the river in places and the care needed with small children – don’t let them run ahead – and too with those not so firm on their feet. Better to stop at the first suspension bridge and return. Take the north side of the river back to Bright and you meet developed country – roads, housing, car park, holiday/camping park and similar. Cross back into the township at the Star Road bridge or carry on to the footbridge opposite the Splash Park. This is where we started our walk guided by of a couple of information boards, which were helpful and interesting - providing glimpses of the history of the people and the river.

Peter Steele
18 January 2021

Date of experience: November 2020
3  Thank Peter S
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 16 January 2021

Never get tired of this walk. Lots of scenery and wildlife to see at all times of the day. Different levels of path and not suitable for a pram or very little people.

Date of experience: January 2021
Thank BronwynM153
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
View more reviews