Monuments/ Statues in Cape Town Central

Top Monuments & Statues in Cape Town Central, South Africa

Monuments & Statues in Cape Town Central

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Types of Attractions
Sights & Landmarks
Sights & Landmarks
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What travellers are saying

  • Nicholas H
    London, UK20 576 contributions
    Nice little square on the Waterfront, best known for the four small statues of S Africa’s four Nobel Prize winners: Luthuli, Tutu, de Klerk and Mandela. They’re interesting of course, but the real fun here is the singing and dancing by local groups, who perform with typical enthusiasm. You can have an ice cream from the stall while you relax here and even ‘borrow’ a dog to take for a walk in aid of charity. This is also where the entrance is to the fascinating V&A Food Market. This Square is a great place to spend some time on a nice day.
    Written 11 February 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • gwyneth v
    Cooroy, Australia76 contributions
    Plenty of parking. As always wonderful views. Never tire of visiting this magnificent structure. The grounds and monument were free from litter and it has been kept in a good state. The lions are so shiny now, from children and adults being photographed on them.
    Written 28 October 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Nicholas H
    London, UK20 576 contributions
    These two benches - one labelled 'whites only', the other 'non-whites only' - have been installed by artist Roderick Sauls on either side of the entrance to the infamous High Court Annex, where all non-whites had to go to be racially classified under the Apartheid regime. There's an information plaque, which provides background on the annex and the regime. Sadly, racism is still present in S African society. This was perfectly illustrated as I stood looking at the benches with a visitor group, when a grossly overweight, middle-aged Afrikaner walked past and yelled at us 'apartheid worked'. It was a shocking moment, which brought home the reality of a nation still divided. If you're in Cape Town, you should try to visit this site but I hope you avoid any such incident becuase it really is a 'must see' location.
    Written 6 February 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Nicholas
    Cape Town, South Africa2 contributions
    Gateway Guides are by far the best guides in Cape Town for history and hiking. And they are freely available at a lot of venues. No excuse not to get one.
    Written 19 February 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Nicholas H
    London, UK20 576 contributions
    This enormous metal statue of a penguin emerges out of a base of plastic refuse, highlighting the current debate about limiting the damage to the world's oceans from single use plastic. It's by the famous Belgian sculptor, Willaim Sweetlove and stands on one end of the V&A Waterfront's swing bridge opposite the Clock Tower and next to the African Trading Store. A great piece of sculpture with an important message.
    Written 3 February 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Nicholas H
    London, UK20 576 contributions
    This monument commemorates an extraordinary historical figure, who started out fighting the British in the Boer Wars, became Prime MInister of South Africa and ended up as a British Cabinet Minister, a Field Marshall in the British Army and a signatory to the United Nations Charter. This is a bronze statue, showing Smuts seated in military fatigues, was unveiled in 1974. Located close to the Company's Garden and next to the Parliament Building, this is a must see for those interested in S African and British History in the first half of the 20th century.
    Written 6 February 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Robert O
    Rotterdam, The Netherlands3 219 contributions
    Perhaps of interest for Anglicans, this monument is at a prominent place on St. Georges Mall near the cathedral. Robert Gray was Cape Town's first Anglican bishop (consecrated as such in 1847 in London!). Unlike the record of Desmond Tutu one of his successors, Gray's record is not very impressive. He was mainly interested in missionary work and spreading the Anglican message. Perhaps better to move this monument back to the cathedral's premises or to a museum.
    Written 30 November 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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