Monuments/ Statues in Moscow

Top Monuments & Statues in Moscow, Russia

Monuments & Statues in Moscow

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586 places sorted by traveller favourites
Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
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What travellers are saying

  • B1714D
    Belgrade, Serbia12 365 contributions
    This solemn monument stands along the western Kremlin walls by the Alexander Gardens.
    The monument is made of red granite with a helmet and flag in honor of all who lost their lives during WWII.
    Written 11 May 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Nikolai V
    London, UK60 contributions
    A statue that will be familiar to anyone who's watched a Russian/Soviet film pre-nineties. The rest of VDNKh is worth a look as well, especially the Vostok rocket, if you're into retro Soviet chic.
    Written 31 December 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • B1714D
    Belgrade, Serbia12 365 contributions
    The Moscow Triumphal Arch stands in the middle of Kutuzov Av. in the western part of the capital. The avenue is named after the Russian Imperial forces General commander who defeated Napoleon in 1812 (although that issue is little bit questionable, as both sides have their views).
    You will arrive here by metro and exit at one of the most beautiful and the deepest station of Moscow - Park Pobedy, which is the first reason.
    Second reason is the Triumphal Arch itself - not that magnificent as the Paris' Arc de Triomphe, but still very nice. For best pics use the pedestrian underground passageway, as the Arch is in the middle of the Av. dividing traffic directions. There're several chronologic plaques explaining the Patriotic war around the Arch.
    Third reason is the Borodino battle panorama museum, 5 min walk from it (read in separate review).
    Fourth reason is the terrific Victory park with its museum (read also in a separate review).
    If visiting all, count on at least 3 hours.
    Written 9 May 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • B1714D
    Belgrade, Serbia12 365 contributions
    The moment you exit the metro station VDNH, you spot this tall and elegant monument. It stands atop the Museum of Cosmonautics beneath it (read that review).
    Russians are very proud on their space program so they built this entire area in honor of Gagarin and others who contributed to their success.
    I suggest walking the Cosmonauts Alley first with monuments to famous Russians in space, in the middle of which is our Solar system monument with all planets. Behind it rises this launching rocket monument. Very impressive.
    Written 12 May 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • saronic
    Zurich, Switzerland22 325 contributions
    A stroll through the only about 250m long pedestrian lane between Tverskaya street and the Bolshoi theatre makes for a very pleasant experience. There might be some activity meant for visitors, like two young women putting on a duel show with sabres, when I was there, but in general the atmosphere here is much less touristy and commercialised than in the longer and better known pedestrian Arbat street.

    There are several restaurants and cafés, also with outdoor seating, such as the café 'Akademia' or a 'Shokoladnitsa' from the well known chain. As a historical street - the name means 'Chamberlain street' - there is also some interesting architecture from tsarist days to look at.

    Wit the pedestrianisation more than 20 years ago attractive retro style street lamps have been put up. Just next to a statue of Sergei Prokofiev, walking in the middle of the street with hat and raincoat, is a museum dedicated to the famous 20th century composer.
    Written 29 July 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Tas G
    Athens, Greece1 285 contributions
    A very magnificent monument in an area a little bit far from the center and a little bit busy from traffic. A huge monument where you need to turn your head up to see it.
    A real big monument for a real big man of history of mankind!!!
    Written 25 November 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • CharlesA
    Key Biscayne, FL488 contributions
    The monument depicts a boy and a girl, both blindfolded, standing in front of a semicircle of 13 statues which depict adult vices, such as alcoholism, drug addiction, and prostitution, that affect children. The figures are perceptibly closing in on two unaware playmates, a girl and a boy, with the centrepiece figure being 'Indifference'.
    Apparently there was some disagreement between the city and the Arts Commission about the location od Shemyakin's monument.
    Certainly an unusual monument, but worth a brief visit - uncrowded!
    Written 22 August 2014
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Takarasina
    920 contributions
    We visited the place together with our grandchildren in January, during New Year holidays. It was dark and both figures were beautifully illuminated.
    I agree that it is deadly overshadowed by the stunning St Basil's Cathedral. The author of the monument felt it and it was therefore he insisted that his creation must be placed in the middle of the Red Square, by the (nowadays) GUM department store. It were obscurantist communists who moved it later to its modern place.
    Anyhow, these two gentlemen really mean a lot for us Russians since they virtually saved our country from total loss of its sovereignty at the moment when it was almost defunct. Never again was Russia in such a danger - maybe only after Hitler's attack.
    Strongly recommended!
    Written 7 January 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • B1714D
    Belgrade, Serbia12 365 contributions
    Marhsal Zhukov was the greatest Russian WWII hero commanding Soviet troops in many areas all over occupied USSR. He's responsible for many Nazi Germany defeats, as well the one who led the Red army on Berlin.
    His equestrian monument deservedly stands in front of the History museum towards Manege Sq.
    Written 12 May 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • GrandDaddyDom
    Tucson, AZ80 contributions
    We arrived in the vicinity via Metro Orange #06 Oktyabr'skaya station. The Lenin Monument is located on Kaluzhskaya Garden Square that sits astride a street that was once a part of the original route of the Kaluzhskaya Highway. The highway was used by the army of Napoleon as they retreated from Moscow. The square contains a small fountain array and a flower bed. The square has many benches that provide seating. There are several information boards around the boundary of the square that provide information about the area and specifically the square. The information provided is in Russian and English.

    The centerpiece of the square is the monument to Lenin. Around the base is a collection of Soviet Citizens including armed and unarmed men, women and children and others in regional (?) dress. The woman above the grouping represents a symbol of the Victory of the Revolution under Lenin. The statue of Lenin is mounted on a granite pillar that towers over the square. I have read that this is the tallest statue of Lenin in Moscow and the third tallest in Russia. The plaque states it was erected 5 November 1985.
    Written 23 September 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Takarasina
    920 contributions
    Alexander Pushkin, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy - these names are well-known to anyone who is interested in Russia.
    Not many foreigners know that Pushkin's ancestors came from Africa - most experts say that from Ethiopia but some claim that from Cameroon. One way or another, everybody agrees that he's the father of both modern Russian language and Russian literature.
    To my mind, this monument which I visited together with my grandchildren in January, during New Year holidays, is the most elegant in Moscow. There were so many joyful people around, everybody smiled, enjoyed snowy but mild weather and I thought that our great poet would have loved to see this merry crowd around him. He was such a lover of life himself, after all...
    Strongly recommended!
    Written 7 January 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • drogilmour
    Guatemala City, Guatemala2 691 contributions
    When walking towards Gorkyi park we saw Peter’s statue and decided to visit in first. We were on the other embankment so we walked towards the bridge, made it into the Red October factory district and reached a fence. The naval sculpture is off-limits, no wonder tourist buses simply drive by on the embankment opposite Muzeon and leave.

    We got great shots from the embankment at Muzeon.
    Written 15 December 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Takarasina
    920 contributions
    As well as your soul and every-damn-thing inside you that can feel pain.
    Who, except for us Russians, remembers today the first of September of 2004? Terrorist attack on a school in Ossetia, Northern Caucasus, 1,128 hostages seized, most of them children, 331 died including 186 boys and girls.
    Me and my wife walked across central Moscow and stumbled upon this extraordinary piece of art in February. A tribute to killed kids... We were electrified by pain. We had watched that tragedy live, on TV. Exhausted, half-naked children scared to death to such an extent that they could not walk. Our soldiers bringing them out of that inferno in their own hands, covering them with their own bodies - undefended from behind.
    Thank you, Mr Tsereteli! Your architectural sins against Moscow are enormous but by this monument you've at least tried to atone for them.
    Please hold on for a couple of minutes, take off your hat and bow your head. One hundred and eighty-six innocent souls perished among bullets of grown-up bearded cannibals, after all...
    Written 26 February 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • MuscoviteVT
    Moscow, Russia12 996 contributions
    I have only seen this statue in the dusk, cannot say much about its artistic values. Nor about the original, for that matter…
    True, Maya Plisetskaya was an outstanding personality; doing her own show in the world, she at the same time promoted the Russian ballet, too. It makes sense to have her statue close to the Bolshoi she is so tightly associated with.
    Victor Mitroshin, the sculptor, is said to have the consent of the ballerina, presenting her as Carmen, her most striking creation.
    The mural to the left was made the Brasilian street artist Eduardo Cobra; here she is the ‘Dying Swan’, the signature part of her younger days.
    Written 16 May 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Andrew M
    7 160 contributions
    Pushkin Square is probably the third most popular square in Moscow, after Red and Revolution Squares.I would suggest that you take a ride on the subway to Pushkina station or Tverskaya Station, and walk back towards Revolution Square via Tverskaya Street. The Pushkin subway station has a bust of Pushkin, and statue of Maxim Gorky. The pedestrian underpass at Pushkin Square was the site of a bombing in 2000, and a small memorial has been placed to commemorate the memory of the victims.

    Once you are at street level, the statue of Pushkin dominates the Square. The Square used to be named Strastnaya Square, and it's centerpiece was the Monastery of Christ's Passions. This monastery was controversially destroyed in the 1930's, and the Square renamed Pushkin Square, in honour of the 100th anniversary of the poets death. The Pushkin statue which had stood on the other side of the Square, was moved to it's current location in 1950.

    A fountain and beautiful flower bed are at the north east section of the square. In the middle of the flower bed is a monument to the Monastery of Christ's Passions. It was erected in 2012, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the retreat from Moscow by Napoleon and his Grand Armee. It is said that the monastery bells were ringing amidst
    the ruins of Moscow when the French retreated.The church is still lobbying today to have the monastery rebuilt, and the Pushkin statue moved back to it's former location.

    To the north west section of the park is another grave marker and a small wooden orthodox cross. During the reconstruction of Pushkin Square in 2013, numerous human remains were found. These remains were placed in a coffin and reburied at this site.It is thought that the remains could belong to the nuns of the monastery, persons who were executed during the Napoleonic invasion or benefactors of the monastery.

    To the west of the Square, stands the Izvestia Hall building, on the side of which, is a old Soviet mural, which has the image of Lenin, a Soviet star and the hammer & sickle insignia.There are many F&B options around the square, and it is a great place to relax and "people watch".
    Written 16 November 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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