We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The Tripadvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Cape Camino

Cape Town Central, South Africa
More
About Cape Camino
Cape Camino is a walking pilgrimage route around the Cape Peninsula. Walk Your Way around the beautiful Cape Peninsula, meeting others while going about your own adventure. Inspired by Camino de Santiago, the route celebrates our special South African diversity, showcasing our sacred sites along the way. The terrain is peri-urban, through wine lands, beaches, fynbos thickets and through small communities all around Cape Town, South Africa. Distances are usually between 15 and 20km per day, but its all up to you. Just like in Spain, you get your passport and set off on your Camino. However, this passport gives you loads of discounts and value adds along the route, so you can stay cheaply wherever you go. And the route is found on Google Maps under ROUTE on the site. Then, If you'd rather have your logistics arranged for you, there is a team of Cape Camino experts who offer packages which range from 1 to 7 days on the route, which include guides and transport etc. While this team has identified the route, the route is owned by locals in Cape Town and used as a platform for opportunities and economic growth for the nation.
Read more
Travellers talk about

Cape Camino
Booking unavailable on Tripadvisor

Want other options you can book now?
33Reviews1Q&A
Traveller rating
  • 22
  • 10
  • 0
  • 1
  • 0
Traveller type
Time of year
Language
Selected filters
  • Filter
  • English
Popular mentions
Melanie N wrote a review 10 May
Hong Kong, China13 contributions6 helpful votes
A wonderful way to join the Cape Camino Winelands community and understand, as international visitors, so much more about the history and diversity of the region and its people. A terrific cast of characters who made us welcome and comfortable on every step of our pilgrim's journey. We learned so much about ourselves, our partnership, our fellow pilgrim, and our hosting community.
Read more
Date of experience: May 2022
Helpful
Share
Faiza (Bardien) Leith wrote a review Aug 2021
Cape Town Central, South Africa10 contributions
+1
Friday, 13 August 2021: day 0 of the Flowers and Bees Camino, I arrived at Die Ark / Hoogelee farm in KORINGBERG, 90 minutes drive from Cape Town. My host, Bregda Mostert offered to show me the rare ( for this area) Renosterveld. A licensed quad biker, Bregda drove me and her wonderfully obedient German Shepherd, Leila, 400 m up to the WIFi tower and site of her ongoing project : a conservation area with a soon to be renovated lapa for full moon-hikers and tourists to enjoy the views of Table Mountain in the far distance and the freighters at sea 80 km away. After the rains, the veld was awash with colourful blooms. When I marvelled at the wheat and canola fields, Bregda explained how chemically laden food crops are. I value immensely the profound lesson I learnt from her: we are foolishly fuelling our bodies with processed foods and sugar. To walk an ache- and inflammation- free Camino, indeed, in our striving after spiritual growth, we need to cease polluting our bodies with harmful products. As a health life coach Bregda urges that we mind what we put in our mouths. Thebus Mostert braaied a snoek and Bregda prepared a delicious sugar-,gluten- and preservative-free supper. On the next day's walk I saw what Bregda meant: all morning, a crop-spraying plane zoomed overhead, spraying the fields . We had a break at Bregda’s 2 friends’ farms / loo stops and crossed the BERG River and reached WITTEWATER within 4 hours. The hosts and service providers at WITTEWATER , Estelle, Solly Benjamin, the Cloetes and Yvette Hendricks at this historic Moravian station enthusiastically told me about their village history and an ongoing project to assist the elderly. Day 2, 15 Aug, 7.30 am. Solly and Yvette guided me out of Wittewater up the mountainside to a path above the white stones spelling out the village name. The path is steep and rocky all the way and later levels out westwards towards GOEDVERWACHT. Boots or shoes with good traction rather than ordinary tackies would be better to avoid twisting an ankle or stepping into the many holes dug by moles and babooons. Tip: wear tick-repellant clothing for this stretch! GOEDVERWACHT is a gem tucked in between mountains: flowers and fruit trees spill over on the sides of every cottage. The villagers are the descendants of freed slaves and of the Khoi. They are seeking to re- establish their identities, since most had been assigned names by the missionaries. Belinda joined the Camino and we were warmly welcomed by Loraine Cornelius at Goedverwacht’s information office. Day 3, 16 Aug. Ulrich guided us through Goedverwacht: to a sadly desecrated rock art shelter, past small holdings to the heritage grave site of the founding slaves of the village. Ulrich works the only working mill in S.A. alongside Stephan Gennrich, the volunteer manager at the mill and sponsor of the cobbler's shop. Stephan - a veteran activist - passionately enlightened us about all the initiatives to uplift the village and their legal pursuit of reparations for the First People of Goedverwacht. We left the lovely home of retired teacher Cynthia Dodderenberg and were driven to KAPTEIN’S KLOOF in the afternoon to Melanie and Billie Wilson' superbly restored historical cottages. Melanie’s generous hospitality is matched by her passionate sharing of the history of KAPTEIN'S KLOOF. She excitedly brought out the heritage tomes, to confirm the historical details. Another historical seam was added to this Camino as I listened to Melanie relate that in the 18th century KAPTEIN Adam Kok had settled here with his people and flocks. Melanie sent her helper, Katrina Abrahams, out to me to share a story about the Kloof in which she has lived and worked for almost 70 years. I'm hoping that, between the two of them, stories will emerge that can reveal our past and so lighten the path ahead. Belinda lounged in the hot tub and I poured through the history of all the mission stations in South Africa. On Day 4, 17 Aug, we were expertly guided by Koko from Melanie's Guesthouse through the soft drizzle for 23 km to AURORA to Hester and Jan Brink’s lovely guesthouse, where we were thoroughly spoilt. I valued the many family stories they shared and the history of the area: there is a historical monument showing where in 1752 the Arc of Meridian was positioned and in 1838 the Maclear Beacon. On day 5, our efficient chaperone Marinda steered us through the non-stop rain to KLEIN TAFELBERG. If not for Marinda, I would’ve been tempted by a lift – although only 2 vehicles passed us for 24 km. I can recommend a heavy duty full-length plastic raincoat that kept me dry. In our chalet, we were the only two persons in this pretty fynbos-sed camp. Gesie Louw dried my wet clothes and provided supper. On day 6, Yolandi plodded with us uphill through loose sand, but past delightful blooms all the way to REDELINGHUYS to Jane Louw’s guesthouse where she welcomed us with a footbath, tea and scones. Artist Elmie Smit took us for a stroll through this pretty dorp to her studio to have supper with her artist-husband Mel Burger. We talked about the South African War of 1899-1902 and Belinda and Elmie related the horrors their ancestors’ had endured in the British concentration camps. Day 7 was magical: VERLORENVLEI was full after years’ of drought and the path lined with a variety of flowers and reeds . Chaperone Elmie identified the many birds and steered us to the farm below the DIEPKLOOF SHELTER. The farmer sent his Malawian worker, Frankie, to take me to the SHELTER, which has been declared a PROVINCIAL HERITAGE SITE. It takes its name from the nearby Diepkloof stream and overlooks the Verlorenvlei wetland. This shelter yielded “an exceptional collection of over 400 intentionally engraved ostrich eggshell, dated to around 60 000 years ago - amongst the earliest known examples of storage and transport vessels anywhere in the world. These engraved fragments of ostrich eggshells showcase early development of a graphic tradition, the ability of our ancestors to conceptualise patterns and forms that do not exist in nature and the complex use of symbols to mediate social interactions. The early appearance of more refined stone tools between 100 000 and 74 000 years ago provides evidence of abstract thinking, technological innovation and the ability to plan and strategize.” In KLAREFONTEIN, Marinda and Barend Steyn treated us with tasty, healthy meals. They had cleared the path to Elands Bay and planted white direction markers. Their two workers cum chaperones, Prince and Tim steered us up the sandy paths to ELANDS BAY on day 8, where my Camino ended. Gabrielle and Peggy have organised this Camino to yield so much more than a Spanish Camino can offer. The mission station communities share their histories and benefit from the Camino fees, while farmers like Barend Steyn tell how new farming methods maintain the pH levels of the soil - and our bodies. Our hosts provided nourishing meals that protect the body - to better undertake a pilgrimage. This historically unique belt of our country can yield more rock-art sites of our ancestors. Artist / academic Pippa Skotnes deems the Bushmen’s paintings to be their deeds, their “claim to the country”. James Suzman writes that these hunter-gatherers waved to Vasco da Gama’s crew from the shores of St Helena Bay, but much to da Gama’s disappointment, they had “little of value to trade with and displayed little interest in the cinnamon, cloves, seed pearls, and gold that da Gama presented to them.” Suzman explains that the Bushmen had “few needs, produced no surpluses, and, as a result, saw little point in trade”. (Affluence without Abundance, p. 37ff) It is a privilege to view these sacred paintings and walk in the footsteps of our First People. Zen-like, they lived sustainably, but were dispossessed, exterminated by frontier commando units. May the breezes bear their stories that can instill contentment in Camino walkers. Faiza (Bardien) Leith 23/8/2021
Read more
Date of experience: August 2021
Helpful
Share
Dietrichsen wrote a review Feb 2021
Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa3 contributions
What a fabulous experience! Highly recommended. The beautiful landscape enriched by kindness and warm hospitality throughout.
Read more
Date of experience: February 2021
Helpful
Share
Lynray wrote a review Feb 2021
Cape Town Central, South Africa1 contribution
We had a great time walking the Wine to Water route of the Camino . We went with the Global Tribe community group . Many beautiful sights on the way. It reminded me of the time I walked the Camino de Santiago. Will definitely be trying out more routes in the future
Read more
Date of experience: December 2020
Helpful
Share
Ina wrote a review Mar 2020
3 contributions
As the days went by, I realized that with every step, I was walkig away from unimportant and unnecessary stuff. Life is not about "things" but about God, the Creator of all things. There is silence and peace that I can not really describe.
Read more
Date of experience: March 2020
Helpful
Share
Previous