Casa de Las Tejerinas

Casa de Las Tejerinas, Estepona: Address, Casa de Las Tejerinas Reviews: 4/5

Casa de Las Tejerinas
4
Points of Interest & Landmarks
About
Suggested duration
1-2 hours
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing

4.0
6 reviews
Excellent
1
Very good
5
Average
0
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Turista-Inglesa
Estepona, Spain24 027 contributions
A beautiful 18th Century house now housing Art exhibitions
Feb 2014 • Couples
.
The house of the Tejerinas is named after two sisters who were born, lived and died (but never married) in this house. It is what the Spanish call a "palacete". Not actually a palace, rather a large smart residence. The sisters - Francisca (Paca) and Carmen, were born in the mid 19th century, 100 years after the house in its present form was built, taking in a much older building.

At that time the Plaza de las Flores (then called the Plaza de la Constitución), was not only the physical centre of the little town of Estepona, but the centre of its social life with the daily market installed in part of it, bullfights held here, and elegant parties hosted by the Tejerina sisters.

On the death of the surviving sister, Paca, the house was willed for use as a hospital, run by nuns. It was subsequently taken over by the Town Council and has been an Adult Training Centre and a Cultural Centre. It was also for some years the Delegación de Juventud, as the large ceramic sign over the doorway proudly states. It's some two or thjree years since this moved out, but things can move slowly here in Andalusia!

Currently it is the Tourist Office - Lidia is very helpful and has good stocks of maps and leaflets - and an excellent art gallery. The exhibitions change regularly, and it's worth checking back on a second visit as it may well be something new.

But another very good reason to go to the Casa de las Tejerinas is for the building itself. Like the Casa del Aljibe (now housing the Museo Arqueológico - go and see it), it is a typical example of a gentleman's residence in the 18th-19th century. You start with a large entrance porch, called a Zaguan. Traditionally these have been considered part of the street rather than the house, and so in the past beggars or vendors might set up there, and people had no compunction about sheltering inside out of the occasional winter rainstorm.

The Zaguan always leads to a central patio, here we have a very beautiful example, with arches both at ground level and on the first floor balcony.

This balcony is in fact the corridor giving access to the rooms at that level; a handsome staircase leads up to them..

Do go in and see this lovely building, whether or not you have time to visit the art exhibition too.
.
Written 15 February 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Frequently Asked Questions about Casa de Las Tejerinas